Antique Handguns

An exceptionally nice and scarce S&W factory refinished New Model No. 3 Single Action Revolver chambered in .44 S&W Russian, with Japanese navy markings. This revolver falls into a known serial number range (26718-27107) of New Model No. 3s shipped to Takata on October 4, 1890. A Japanese Navy anchor is stamped on the butt. The barrel is numbered to a different gun. Mismatched parts are commonly found on these Japanese contract revolvers. Matching serial numbers are on the butt, cylinder and barrel latch. There is a S&W factory rework star stamped on the grip frame and rear cylinder face. According to the previous owner, this revolver was given to the Pan Am Airways bankruptcy agent during Pan Am bankruptcy proceedings in Japan, circa 1980s.  This revolver is in very fine as factory refurbished, retaining 97% nickel plating showing some mild flaking mostly on the grip straps. Some darkened case colors remain on the hammer and trigger guard. The grips are fine showing minor handling marks mostly near/on the bottoms and crisp checkering overall. Mechanically, it is excellent. (PIMU-917)

$3,800.00

An unusually nice condition Colt New Navy Model of 1895 U.S.N. marked revolver, .38 Long Colt, 6” barrel, blued finish, checkered black gutta percha grips, serial #  9519X with Naval Anchor markings on butt strap, Navy issue No.. 9878 and “W.B.W” inspecttor’s mark. In overall very good to nearly fine condition with a majority of muted original blued finish to metal surfaces, a good bore, crisp action, good sharp markings and very good condition original grips. A Colt factory letter confirming all features, indicating the USN service number “9878” was assigned to the revolver and noting the pistol was shipped to the United States Government Commander Navy Yard Brooklyn, New York April 28, 1898. Most  Navy Service Colts suffered from humid, salty conditions, but this one was obviously very well cared-for!  A fine example of a U.S. Navy-marked martial pistol shipped just a week after the start of the Spanish-American war. It should also be a very practical shooter.  (PPPL-842)

$2,950.00

Smith & Wesson .44 Double Action First Model Revolver with Factory Letter and Holster Rig Attributed to Montana Lawman Dr. Joseph Kumpe. Made in 1882. This revolver came from the John Fox collection. The included factory letter states that this revolver was shipped on July 17, 1882 and delivered to M. W. Robinson of New York City. We know from signed letters from one Miller Hansen that the revolver came to him from a family friend in 1925, Dr. Joseph. M. Kumpe. Kumpe was born in La Grange, Alabama and studied medicine at the Alabama Medical College, and in 1882 moved to White Sulfur Springs, Montana. There he practiced medicine and was elected to the position of Meagher County coroner, and upon the death of the Sheriff, he was appointed to that position as well. During this time he carried out the duties of both offices. Kumpe was involved in the hanging of Henry Herbert Metzger, a murderer and subject of the article “The Strange Sombrero” from the “Pacific Northwest Quarterly” published in 1945. Kumpe is pictured in the article pronouncing Metzger dead after the hanging. Kumpe passed away on August 3, 1905 in Meagher County and was survived by his wife and three children. The revolver shows standard markings including matching serial numbers on the barrel latch, barrel, cylinder, and butt. Includes a period holster rig set up for a left handed draw and containing 34 .44 Russian cartridges in the belt. The revolver and holster rig where reportedly used by Kumpe during his term in office as sheriff. There is also a full dossier of information on the revolver and the history surrounding it, including the aforementioned letters, photocopies of “The Strange Sombrero” and Kumpe’s obituary, and full sized photographs of the images from the article among other information.  CONDITION: Very fine, showing 70% plus original nickel finish. There is some hazing of the nickel in areas as well as some very mild scattered oxidation. Nearly all of the blue remains on the trigger guard and 60% bull case colors on the hammer. The holster rig is also very fine with light use/storage evidence. A great piece of Montana history! (UABP-826)

$4,800.00

A nice condition Adams British Army Mark III (Model of 1878) .455 Eley British Service Double action (DA) Revolver. Original finish has largely gone to gray, with scattered pitting. Bluing is mainly in sheltered areas. Mechanically fine in both SA and DA mode.  Serial # 1764X matches on the frame and cylinder.  One-piece checkered walnut grip is in unusually nice condition. Has correct large solid lanyard ring. Octagonal 6″ barrel. V-notch rear sight. Loading gate and swing-out ejector rod both work perfectly.  Very nice bore with typical shallow British rifling. Has profuse proof marks, including each chamber of the cylinder. All-in-all a nice, beefy, fully-functional example of a black powder-era Adams cartridge revolver that looks like something straight out of the moivie Zulu. This should only be shot with mild .455 handloads. (EMYR-339)   $1,450

$1,450.00

A Hopkins & Allen XL Model “Dog’s Head” chambered in .38 rimfire in very fine condition. It is a 5-shot single-action revolver with spur trigger and round barrel. It has a 3.5” barrel. It retains 80%+ original nickel finish with just scratches and just a few small losses to the nickel. The patent date markings are crisp, so this does not appear to be have been re-nickeled! Has nice mechanical function with a fairly tight lockup –just a very slight wobble at full cock. It has original “Dog’s Head” black gutta percha grips that are in very nice condition. Hopkins & Allen was a sister company to Merwin, Hulbert, so Dog’s Head grips are sometimes also found on Merwin, Hulbert, revolvers. The low serial # (191X) would indicate early production, before 1885.  (ERY-719)  $275

$275.00

A scarce blued S&W New Model 3 SA .44 Russian with Factory Letter. 6″ barrel chambered in .44 Russian. Pinned full radius front sight with “V” notch rear sights. Two-piece black gutta percha grips, checkered with diamond and S&W monogram. Serial # 2967X. Comes with a Smith & Wesson archival letter dated January 10, 2013 and signed by S&W Factory Historian Roy G. Jinks. Letter documents the revolvers’ correct configuration and shipment to famed western gunsmith W.F. Sheard on August 3, 1896. CONDITION: Very fine overall with 40% original blue overall with the remainder in a pleasant gray patina. The cylider has gon completely gray. Bore is fine and bright with very light pitting. Action indexes perfectly and lock-up is tight. Trigger pull is excellent, and I suspect that it was tuned by W.F. Sheard. The original gutta percha grips are excellent, faded slightly to a deep chocolate brown. (EABK-256)  $2,395

$2,395.00

A scarce and very sought-after .38 S&W 5-shot spur trigger Model 2 “Baby Russian” (with long ejector rod housing) revolver. This one has 99% of its original nickel finish. This is a single action-only model.  This gun looks just about mint and appears to be unfired! (There are NO firing evidence marks or scratches on the backplate. The black gutta percha grip panels are both in excellent condition. Bore is perfect–also appears unfired. Serial #1959X.  This revolver came from an estate in Ohio. (# EIKS-573)

$3,750.00

A scarce .22 Rimfire Stevens New Model 2nd Issue Pocket Rifle. Serial # 930X. (Made before 1897.) Has a 15″ round barrel oct. shank & blue finish. Combination globe front sight with elevation and windage adjustable peep rear sight. Medium-size iron frame with nickel finish, spur trigger, bushed firing pin, mushroom style release button & linkage operated extractor. Has two-piece rosewood grips. Butt has slotted cap for stock attachment. Barrel, frame and stock have matching numbers! Estimated production 15,000, from 1875-1896. Includes an 11-1/2″ nickel finished detachable iron shoulder stock. The rame retains 70% nickel with areas of flaking most prevalent on the right side. The stock retains 40% nickel. Barrel retains 80% dull lightly worn blue. Grips have lightly worn finish with small marks. Bore retains sound rifling showing small spots of very light pitting. All in all, a dandy little Stevens. These ones that are Federally antique are difficult to find. The ATF has exempted all Stevens pocket rifles from the barrel length restrictions of the National Firearms Act of 1934.  (EPIA-643)  $1,600

$1,600.00

Scarce, very dainty early-production .22 RF. Stevens Old Model Tip Up Pocket Rifle. It’s serial # 340X places it in the early 1870s!  9″ round barrel with octagonal shank and blue finish. Globe front sight with elevation adjustable rear peep sight. Silver finished small brass frame with buttcap to accept shoulder stock. This is the early design without a retaining thumbscrew. Features include spur trigger, sideplate, straight style release button, hammer mount firing pin and spring-operated extractor. Two-piece walnut grips. Barrel, frame, and shoulder stock have matching numbers. Estimated production of 4,000, from 1869-1886. Includes an 11″ iron shoulder stock with Japaned black finish. The frame retains 40% silver finish acquiring a darkened tarnish. Barrel retains 70% lightly faded blue showing spots of light pitting. Grips show worn finish & light handling marks. Bore is dark w/ areas of light pitting retaining lightly worn intact rifling. Stock retains 30% Japaned black finish. All in all, a dandy and very dainty little Stevens. These ones that are Federally antique are difficult to find. The ATF has exempted all Stevens pocket rifles from the barrel length restrictions of the National Firearms Act of 1934. (ERCI-644) $1275

$1,275.00

A scarce caliber .22 rimfire  Stevens New Model Second Issue Pocket Rifle.  Serial # 1085X places it around 1890. Bbl. Has a 10″ round barrels with octagonal shank and thinning blue finish. Combination globe front sight with “Hunter’s Pet”-style vertically adjustable folding leaf rear sight. Nickel finished medium-sized brass frame with sideplate, mushroom style release button, bushed firing pin & linkage operated extractor. Spur trigger in conjunction with a very nice screw-fastened nickel finished finger curl trigger guard. Two-piece rosewood grips. Butt has slotted cap for stock attachment. Frame, bbl. & stock have matching numbers. Estimated production 15,000, from 1875-1896. Includes an 11 1/2″ nickel finished detachable iron shoulder stock. The stock is in exceptionally nice condition, considering that these were usually just very thinly nickel plated.  The action and stock retain 80% nickel showing spots of flaking & wear. Barrel retains 50% dull faded blue with cleaned area of pitting along the left side. Grips show slightly worn finish. Bore has slightly-darkened appearance with intact rifling showing moderate wear. All in all, a dandy little Stevens. These ones that are Federally antique are difficult to find. The ATF has exempted all Stevens pocket rifles from the barrel length restrictions of the National Firearms Act of 1934.  (EURA-645)  $1,350

$1,350.00

A rare 5″ Smith & Wesson .44 Double Action First Model Revolver. Unusually fine condition, retaining 85% original blue finish with the balance thinning to a brown. 95% original case colors remain on the hammer and trigger. The frame pivot screw still shows a distinctive Electric Blue. The grips are also very fine with some minor handling marks and crisp checkering overall. Mechanically excellent. Inside of the right grip panel numbered to another gun. Matching serial numbers on the butt, cylinder, barrel, and barrel latch.  Serial # 272X.  It is very uncommon to find one of these in a blued finish, with a 5″ barrel. Consider the production statistics: Roughly 80% of this model were made with 6.5″ barrels, 15% were made with 4″ barrels, and the remaining 5% were made with 5″ or other barrel lengths. Also, consider that 90% of these guns were ordered with a nickel finish. To find a blued one in this fine condition makes it a quite rare gun!   (PBPC-418)  $2,850

$2,850.00

Smith & Wesson DA .44-40, blued, with the scarce 4 inch barrel. (Most of these were made in nickel finish with 6.5″ barrels.) Has an early 4 digit serial number (989X) and high amount of original high polish blue finish with most blue loss and flaking to cylinder. There is unusually strong case coloring on the hammer and trigger. All screw heads are in perfect shape. The original black gutta percha rips have sharp checkering and no cracks. Barrel is shiny and has strong sharp rifling with just some small scattered areas of light pitting. Action is in good working order with tight lock up.  (ENII-444) $3,250

$3,250.00

Belgian-made copy of a S&W .44 Double Action revolver. This revolver is a six shot, double action model with a 6-inch barrel and is chambered in 44-40 Winchester — as is marked (“For .44. Winchester Cartridge”) on the barrel rib. There is no maker marking. Marked “Belgium” on the left side of the frame and serial number 183X on the right side of the frame along with typical Belgian proof marks. The action works fine in double and single action with good timing, but the lock-up at full cock is slightly wobbly. The bore is good, and looks quite shootable with sharp rifling, but some pitting. I’d rate the bore at 6/10. The smooth walnut grips are good looking and well-proportioned but possibly replacements and the grip screw nut (brass) is definitely a replacement.  (See photos.) Also included in a very nice condition Lawrence of Oregon pre-WW2 leather shoulder holster (for a right-hander) that fits quite well.  (IUS-711) $995

$1,125.00

Scarce Smith and Wesson Double Action Frontier chambered in .44-40 Winchester. Here is another great “off the ranch” revolver, from north-central Idaho. Has a 6-1/2″ barrel, 1-9/16″ cylinder, fixed sights, DA/SA action, and original black gutta percha grips that are worn and faded to a pleasant chocolate brown. Single action mechanism locks back but the hammer will release with thumb pressure. Double action works well and locks the cylinder tightly. Bore shows light pitting but is bright, with good rifling. Serial numbers match on butt, cylinder, latch, barrel, and grips. Grips are also inscribed inside with the name “Sam Penny” on one side and “Lapwai, Idaho” on the other. Original nickel finish is only about 70% but the factory markings are clear. One grip panel has a chip, and there are some small indentations at the butt, where this revolver’s frame was apparently used at least once, to drive tacks. (So you can tell folks: “This gun is a tack driver.”) Please see photos for details. Manufactured between 1886-1898, with just 15,340 produced.  (The mast majority of antique S&&W large frame DAs were chambered in .44. S&W Russian.) This one falls in the middle of that range at #642X — circa 1892. EPLS-616)

$2,875.00

Rare antique Smith and Wesson New Model 3 Single Action in the unusual .44-40 chambering. Like many others, this one has had the barrel bobbed to 5-1/4″ length and a Lyman front sight installed.  The serial number is 201X, making it 1896 or 1897 production. The New Model 3 borrowed the barrel-mounted frame latch and rounded butt design from the S&W double action top break design. I was told that the original owner of this revolver was a trapper and lawman in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan who carried this revolver in his official capacity. Most Model 3 SAs were made in .44 S&W Russian. But less than 1,000 of these were made in .44-40 and I doubt that there are more than a few dozen of those in good working condition, like this one. This revolver’s mechanical function is quite good. There’s one small area of pitting on the left side of the barrel, near the muzzle. (See photos.) The cylinder, chambers, and barrel are clean and free of rust.  This would make a fantastic SASS competition revolver, or just a practical shooter. (LUIU-468).

$2,650.00

Nickel plated, 6″ barrel chambered in .44 Russian. Pinned full radius front sight with “V” notch rear sights. Two piece black gutta percha grips, checkered with diamond and S&W monogram. Serial # 2143X. Comes with a Smith & Wesson archival letter dated June 23, 2006 and signed by S&W Factory Historian Roy G. Jinks. Letter documents the revolvers’ correct configuration and shipment to Hartley & Graham Co., New York City, New York on April 22, 1887. CONDITION: Very fine overall with 60-70% original nickel with scattered areas of brown patina. Bore is fine and bright with light pitting. Action is tight and crisp. Grips are excellent showing just modest wear. (ECCU-447)  $2,495

$2,495.00

A scarce factory-engraved Merwin, Hulbert Medium Frame Double Action Pocket Model. This is a 5-shot double action model with a 3-1/2 inch barrel, chambered in .38 S&W caliber and manufactured in the 1880’s. As you can see from the photos, it has a nickel finish, folding hammer spur, and mother of pearl grips. The grips are in excellent condition with brilliant colors and no chips or cracksHas 50% original nickel finish, with the balance in a pleasant gray patina. The action works as new in double and single action, and it has considerable “cylinder suction”! The factory engraving is of the “punch dot ” style popular from the 1870s to 1900, and features an owl engraved on the left side. The bore is bright and shiny with sharp rifling and scattered light freckling. According to the Art Phelps book on Merwin, Hulbert guns, less than 2% of their revolvers were factory engraved.  This revolver came from a small town in Pennsylvania. Note that the cartridges and pistol stand pictured are not included. (ARYG-362)

$1,750.00

S&W .38 Single Action Second Model Revolver.  Serial # 1610X.  (Made circa 1888.)  3-1/4″ barrel. Only about 40% original nickel finish, and nice grips. I bought this gun in Illinois. Action needs repair–cylider does not advance when cocked. Note that since this is a black powder era S&W, so it would be safe to shoot only with very mild handloads, even if repaired. (CPR-038)  $725

$725.00 $675.00

Scarce S&W .44 Russian Double Action First Model with Roy Jinks-signed S&W factory letter. Serial # 394X. The factory letter confirms it was shipped on July 31, 1883, to M.W. Robinson in New York City in the current configuration. Poor exterior finish, but fine mechanical condition. Grips are in fairly good condition, with slightly worn checkering. Left grip had a chip at the base (shipment damage), but I was able make a neat Krazy Glue repair, to return the chipped pieces to their places, so it now looks fine. See the photos that were taken before that grip repair. Has a very slight cylinder wobble at full cock, otherwise fine mechanically. Light pitting in bore, but nice distinct rifling. (CGPR-044)  $1,500

$1,500.00

Scarce S&W .44 Russian Double Action First Model Revolver with pearl grips and Factory Letter.  Serial # 3321X. The factory letter lists this revolver as shipped on April 16, 1896, to Latimore & Co. with a 6 1/2 inch barrel, blue finish, and hard rubber grips. (It now has mother of pearl grips.)  Has a slight cylinder wobble at full cock, otherwise fine mechanically. Light pitting in bore, but nice distinct rifling. (KUUG-550) $1,675

$1,875.00

Desirable Early .38 S&W 5-shot spur trigger Model 2 “Baby Russian” (with long ejector rod housing) revolver. This one has about 95% of its nickel finish. This is a single action-only model. This one won’t hold full cock, so it is being sold as “non-shooter.” The black gutta percha grip panels are both in excellent condition. One side plate screw is marred. Bore has Very Good rifling, and some frost in the grooves. I’d rate it 6/10. Serial # 703XX.  Note that since this is a black powder era S&W. So even if it is repaired, it would be safe to shoot only with very mild handloads. This revolver came from a ranch in north Idaho. (# BKL-572)

$475.00 $425.00

Belgian-made Montenegrin revolver. This massive revolver is a five shot, double action model and is chambered in 44-40 Winchester. The frame is marked “44”. The action works fine in double and single action with good timing and tight lock up. The frame is marked “BELGIUM”. The bore is good, with distinct rifling with some pits, but it is need of a good cleaning. So to be safe I’d rate it at 5/10. The metal is mostly patina with some shallow pitting. The bluing on the cylinder is remarkably good,, for its age. It has bone grips. The extractor ring lifts and drops, but is not the type that pops down automatically. While not a very practical shooter, it is a working .44-40  and definitely has a great Steampunk vibe. (IEL-588) $925

$925.00 $795.00

Belgian-made Montenegrin revolver. This massive revolver is a five shot, double action model and is chambered in .44-40 Winchester. Barrel rib is marked “.44 Winchester Cartridge” . The action works fine in double and single action with good timing and tight lock up. The frame is marked “BELGIUM”. The bore is good, with distinct rifling and some scattered pits. I’d rate it at 5/10. Metal in now mostly patina, with some pitting. It has bone grips. While not a very practical shooter, it is a working .44-40, and it definitely has a great Steampunk vibe. (IEL-587) $975

$975.00 $850.00

Ultra-rare Colt New Service .44-40 revolver, with 6-shot swing-out cylinder. First year of production (1898)! Only the first 250 were made in 1898–of more than 900,000 produced—and hence are legally antique. This revolver’s blue finish appears original, but is now mostly patina. Bluing is present only on trigger and ejector rod. Right grip has a large chip at the heel. Both of the black gutta percha grips have evenly mellowed to a chocolate color. Bore has very good rifling, with some very noticeable pits at mid-bore that probably won’t affect accuracy. I’d rate the bore at 5/10. This revolver came from a ranch in eastern Washington. A pair of pre-medallion Pachmayr grips are also included. (EPLR-081)

$3,500.00

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